Jul 162016
 

(M 9; NGC 6333) [C:45x60s]

(M 9; NGC 6333) [C:45x60s]

Chart generated with Cartes du Ciel

Chart generated with Cartes du Ciel


Comet hunter, Charles Messier, discovered this object in June 1764. Now known as a globular cluster, this gravitationally bound group of stars is located in the constellation Ophiuchus. The dark area below and left of the cluster is part of dark nebula Barnard 64. The group is approximately 25,800 light years from the solar system.
 Posted by at 23:36
May 202016
 

NGC 6426 is a small dim globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus. It is one of the 150 or so globular clusters that orbit the Milky Way galaxy.

(NGC 6426) [C:60x60s]

(NGC 6426) [C:60x60s]


This image is a stack of sixty 60 second monochrome images.

Chart generated with Cartes du Ciel

Chart generated with Cartes du Ciel


The cluster was discovered by German born English astronomer William Herschel in 1786. It lies an estimated 67,000 Lys from the Sun and above the galactic plane.
 Posted by at 12:07
Jul 262015
 

This globular cluster is located in the constellation Delphinus (the Dolphin) at a distance of 135,000 LYs. That distance is 5 times the distance from the Sun to the center of our galaxy. The clusters great distance and very eccentric orbit may indicate it was captured from one of the many dwarf galaxies that the Milky Way captured during its lifetime. Note the numerous background galaxies visible.

NGC 7006 [C:35x30s]

NGC 7006 [C:35x30s]


Chart generated using Cartes du Ciel

Chart generated using Cartes du Ciel

 Posted by at 16:17
Jun 202015
 

NGC 6218 (M 12) [C:60X30s]

NGC 6218 (M 12) [C:60X30s]

Described by Charles Messier as a “nebula without stars”, this globular cluster was discovered by him in 1764. This cluster in located in the constellation Ophiuchus (the Serpent Bearer). It is about 15,700 lys from Earth and ancient in the extreme with an estimated age of 12.6 billion years.

Notice the two adjacent galaxies peeking through the cluster at about 8 o’clock just outside the central condensation. I’ve been able to identify the larger and brighter of the two as PGC 1103219.

 Posted by at 20:15
Jun 092015
 

Long identified as a tightly grouped open star cluster, spectroscopic analysis in the 1970’s showed this group of stars is a loosely grouped globular cluster. It is located in the constellation Sagitta (The Arrow) and is about 13,000 light-years from the Sun. At that distance, the cluster is about 27 light-years in diameter.

NGC 6838 (M 71)

NGC 6838 (M 71)[C:52x30s]

This image shows the cluster viewed through the disk of the Milky Way. Software analysis detects over 12,000 stars in the image.

 Posted by at 00:59